Defamiliarize

“‘They eat beans mostly, this old yellow pair.’ There it was, an everyday word given new life and radiance when set against the skin of an elderly African-American couple: yellow. I understood what my professor meant about extending my vocabulary, not just with new, fancy words, but by going back to what I already knew and making each word work harder. I understood how important it was to defamilarize each word we use, shake off its rust and let it shimmer with meaning. ” — Kevin Haworth

How does digital change books

“With the emergence and growing adoption of the Kindle and the iPad, publishers, writers, readers and software-makers have concerned themselves with shoehorning the old-media image of a book into new media. Everyone asks, ‘How do we change books to read them digitally?’ But the more interesting question is, ‘How does digital change books?’ And, similarly, ‘How does digital change the authorship process?’” — Craig Mod

How a writer reads

“Most people ask three questions of what they read: (1) What is being said? (2) Does it interest me? (3) Is it well constructed? Writers also ask these questions, but two others along with them: (4) How did the author achieve the effects he has? And (5) What can I steal, properly camouflaged of course, from the best of what I am reading for my own writing?” — Joseph Epstein

No solution necessary

“It makes increasingly less sense even to talk about a publishing industry, because the core problem publishing solves — the incredible difficulty, complexity, and expense of making something available to the public — has stopped being a problem.” — Clay Shirky

Go fo a walk

“If you have an hour to kill, go walk. You’d be amazed at how much material I’ve come up with by disconnecting from my internet, my house, my phone and my family and just going for a quiet walk. I know writers who call them “plot walks” because they have a tendency to solve difficult plot issues on their walks. Get out. Walk. Talk to yourself.” — Aaron Mahnke